Our Work

Our Work

Rescues
  • We will go out to retrieve sick, injured or orphaned animals and bring them back to the JRC provide medical care and rehabilitation
  • We do not turn away any wild animal brought to our door who needs our care and attention
Medical Care
  • We provide the best possible veterinary care for animals who stay at the JRC
  • Rehabilitation can include food, medication, physical therapy and necessary surgeries
Research
  • As a center for scientific inquiry into animals and animal behavior, the JRC conducts its own animal research, and also assists private individuals and larger organizations that are interested in researching animals. We work to facilitate projects as best we can. Please contact the JRC if you are interested in pursuing a research project with us.
Education
  • We educate both visitors and the local community on the care and treatment of animals, and their important to the local habitat
  • We provide internships for university-level students who want to learn about the care and treatment of animals
  • We conduct our own research, as well as assist in private research projects for graduate level students, studying animals and animal behavior
Rehabilitation
We have a 6-step protocol for animal rehabilitation:
  1. Information Gathering
    Our first step is to gather as much information as we can about the animal – where did it come from, does it have a family, does the animal have any injuries, and what are its most urgent needs.
  2. Treat any life-threatening conditions
    The next step is to stabilize the animal. Any life-threatening injuries are treated first, and once the animal is stable, secondary health and care issues are addressed. At this point, the animals begin their quarantine in the nursery.
  3. Find a space for the animal
    Once the animals immediate needs have been met, we find a space for the animal in the nursery, and prepare a feeding plan to help bring the animal back to optimal health.
  4. Treatment Plan
    The treatment plan can be a medical treatment plan, a plan for how best to take care of a baby, or a plan on how best to restore an animal to full health.
  5. Preparation for release (if possible)
    If the animal is ready and able to be released, it will begin making visits to the forest next to the Jaguar Rescue Center nursery, and then trips to the primary forest in La Ceiba, where the eventual release will take place.
  6. Preparation for extended stay (when necessary)
    When an animal can’t be released back into it’s natural habitat, we prepare a plan to offer the animal the best life we can. This includes a food plan, a plan for the animal to spend time at the beach, in the forest, and if possible, with people, to give the animal the best possible quality of life.
Release
  • Our first priority at the JRC is to reintroduce as many animals as possible back to their natural homes, and between 2008-2015, the JRC released more than 1200 animals back to their natural habitats. La Ceiba is the area of primary forest where we take the animals back for reintroduction to their native environments.